The Relationship of Weight and Finances

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People often relate to weight, and finances in a sense that those who are obese tend to spend more than those who are not fat.  Although, it is a reality, but the relationship between the two is deeper than that.

Last fall George Washington University conducted a study about the expenses of obese people in America.  The researcher found out that obesity ha a high cost.  An added of $4,879 for women and $2,646 for men yearly.  For the overweight people, the cost is less compared to the obese people but slightly higher than a normal people.

The analysis showed that obese women pay up to nine times more while obese men pay six times more in associated costs than healthy individuals. The results are showing that women tend to loss more than men when it comes to obesity and job-related costs, which includes lost wages, absenteeism, and disability.

When talking about weight and finances, we could not put aside medical cost since obese people tend to go need medical attention more than healthy people.  Medical costs eat up the bulk of income for overweight individual, accounting to around 66% of weight-related costs for women and about 80% for men. Although, it also affects the income of obese men, but for obese women, it accounts for just 30% of the overall costs. An obese female loses further income from lost wages, (38%) more than medical costs.

The study proves that obese women pay as much as nine times. Obese men pay six times more in associated costs than what healthy individuals are paying. The results also proves that women easily affected compared to men when both obesity and job-related costs are at discussed, which includes lost wages, absenteeism, and disability.

Direct medical costs are obvious cost driver.  For overweight individuals, direct medical cost accounts for 66% of weight-related costs for women and 80% for men. It is also the cost driver for obese men, but for obese women it accounts for just 30% of the overall costs. An obese female loses more income through lost wages (38%) than from medical costs.

President and Chief Executive Officer of the Obesity Action Coalition, Joe Nadglowski says the data shows an individual affected by obesity faces not only high medical-related costs, but as well as higher non-medical costs. Here, are the non-medical, obesity-related costs included in the research.

  • Wages
  • Short-term disability
  • Disability pension insurance
  • Sick leave (absenteeism)
  • Productivity (presenteeism)
  • Gasoline use
  • Value of lost life due to premature mortality